Course 2: Week 4

Across many demographics, people are using social media on a daily basis. Social media has changed the way we consume information. Misinformation can be easily spread and negatively impact society. To explicitly address media literacy, our students are more empowered to filter commercialism, propaganda, censorship, media ownership, and stereotyping in the media. What is media? … Continue reading “Course 2: Week 4”

Across many demographics, people are using social media on a daily basis. Social media has changed the way we consume information. Misinformation can be easily spread and negatively impact society. To explicitly address media literacy, our students are more empowered to filter commercialism, propaganda, censorship, media ownership, and stereotyping in the media.

What is media?

Social Media: The 5 Key Concepts

  • Key Concept #1: All Media Messages Are “Constructed”
  • Key Concept #2: Media Messages Shape Our Perceptions of Reality
  • Key Concept #3: Different Audience, Different Understanding of the Same Message
  • Key Concept #4: Media Messages Have Commercial Implications
  • Key Concept #5: Media Messages Embed Points of View
Image by tiday from Pixabay

At times, I’m overwhelmed by the amount of information I have access to on social media. It feels right to know the life of George Floyd and advocate for justice. His story and the tragic killing, at the hands of a police officer, should be made known. But this week has been tough. From George Floyd to Black Lives Matter, knowing some of my family members’ views on BLM are openly racists to witnessing, in real-time, peaceful and disruptive protests happening. All along the backdrop of a Global Pandemic. It’s a lot to deal with. I’ve been vocal about my anti-racist sentiment which has sparked some emotional debate. I’m emotionally drained, to be honest.

How can social media be used for social progress?

How do you help your students process the vast amounts of information on social media and identity misinformation?

How can teacher guides students through the 5 key concepts of social media mentioned above?

One thought on “Course 2: Week 4”

  1. Hello Brittany!

    I hear what you are saying! I feel the same, tired and drained. The world has turned upside down. I have been sitting at home already for more than two months. There is no hope that I will have a normal summer break. The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is running across the world, and there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight. Social media is one of the ways to share news, especially now. It allows finding out news in a rapid manner. Since the spread of COVID-19, social media has been both informative and comfortable for some that are struggling to stay positive at these hard and challenging times. Social distance has been hard since many people do not know what to do and continue to work from home. Celebrities and people all are coming together to fight together: to stop the spread of viruses, raise awareness, and share gratitude. However, there is terrible news that arises from the issue. Since there is a lot of news that is being spread around, people can take advantage of this opportunity and spread fake news, resulting in more panic and confusion.

    You raised a challenging question: How do you help your students process the vast amounts of information on social media and identity misinformation?

    Sometimes we as adults and educated people can be confused by the amount of information. I believe if we develop critical thinking, cultural and social understanding, and the skills to find, select, and evaluate information, our students will survive in the ocean of real and fake news.

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